Autonomic Function Testing and Exercise Physiology Laboratory

Psychophysiology Laboratory: One of the preliminary contributors to the exploration of physiological basis of yogic practices was from Anvesana’s psycho-physiological studies. This laboratory pioneers in autonomic & metabolic function testing, polysomnography and cerebral blood flow dynamics. In the past years, this laboratory has added a lot to the understanding of autonomic modulations following yoga practices, evaluating the functions of autonomic nervous system in various mental states, meditation and breathing practices. To name a few key contributions, an overall parasympathetic predominance and a considerable reduction in metabolic rate & oxygen consumption in Yoga practitioners were demonstrated from this lab. Also, the capability of the autonomic nervous system to respond to stressful stimuli without getting stressed following yoga practices reported from this laboratory has gained great attention.

Autonomic Functions Testing: The autonomic & metabolic functions research group, based on its previous studies, emphasizes the need for understanding the mechanism of action, efficacy, safety and effective administration of Yoga. Also, this laboratory caters to basic science research works in understanding the management of neuropathies associated with non-communicable diseases. Fundamental studies are also being taken up to translate the knowledge base from the traditional literature to the scientific fraternity.

Objectives

  •  To understand the regulatory effect of yoga practices on autonomic nervous system in normal and various pathologies
  • To understand the metabolic changes during yoga practices

Research Facilities

  •  16 Channel Polygraph with telemetry facility
  • Metabolic and Pulmonary functions testing system
  • Continuous Non- Invasive Blood Pressure (NIBP), Finometer MIDI

Publications  

Physiology of Yoga Based Relaxation Techniques

1. Sarang, P. and Telles, S. (2006). Effects of two yoga based relaxation techniques on heart rate variability. International Journal of Stress Management, 13(4): 460-475.

2. Vempati, R.P. and Telles, S. (2002). Yoga-based guided relaxation reduces sympathetic activity judged from baseline levels. Psychological Reports, 90(2): 487-494.

3. Telles, S., Reddy, S.K. and Nagendra, H.R. (2000). Oxygen consumption and respiration following two yoga relaxation techniques. Applied Psychophysiology and Biofeedback, 25(4): 221-227.

4. Vempati, R.P. and Telles, S. (1999). Yoga based relaxation versus supine rest: a study of oxygen consumption, breath rate and volume & autonomic measures. Journal of Indian Psychology, 17(2): 46-52.

Physiology of yoga postures [Yogasanas]

5. Manjunath, N.K. and Telles, S. (2003). Effects of sirsasana (head stand) practice on autonomic and respiratory variables. Indian Journal of Physiology and Pharmacology, 47(1): 34-42.

Physiology of yoga cleansing techniques [Yoga Kriyas]

6. Telles, S., Raghuraj, P., Arankalle, D. and Naveen, K.V. (2008). Immediate effect of high-frequency yoga breathing on attention. Indian Journal of Medical Sciences, 62(1): 20-22.

7. Raghuraj, P., Ramakrishnan, A.G., Nagendra, H.R. and Telles, S. (1998). Effect of two selected yogic-breathing techniques on heart rate variability. Indian Journal of Physiology and Pharmacology, 42(4): 467-472.

Physiology of voluntarily regulated yoga breathing techniques [pranayamas]

8. Raghuraj, P. and Telles, S. (2008). Immediate effect of specific nostril manipulating yoga breathing practices on autonomic and respiratory variables. Applied Psychophysiology and Biofeedback [In Press].

9. Raghuraj, P. and Telles, S. (2003). Effect of yoga-based and forced uninostril breathing on the autonomic nervous system. Perceptual and Motor Skills, 96(1): 79-80.

10. Telles, S., Nagarathna, R. and Nagendra H.R (1994). Breathing through a particular nostril can alter metabolism and autonomic activities. Indian Journal of Physiology and Pharmacology, 38(2): 133-137.

11. Telles, S. and Desiraju, T. (1992). Heart rate alterations in different types of pranayamas. Indian Journal of Physiology and Pharmacology, 36 (4): 287-288.

12. Telles, S. and Desiraju, T. (1991). Oxygen consumption during pranayamic type of very slow-rate breathing. Indian Journal of Medical Research, 94(B): 357-363.

Physiology of meditation [Dhyana]

13. Telles, S., Raghavendra, B. R., Naveen, K. V., Manjunath, N. K., Kumar, S., and Subramanya, P. (2013). Changes in autonomic variables following two meditative states described in yoga texts. Journal of Alternative and Complimentary Medicine, 19(1):35-42.

14. Telles, S., Mohapatra, R.S. and Naveen, K.V. (2005). Heart rate variability spectrum during Vipassana mindfulness meditation. Journal of Indian Psychology, 23(2): 1-5.

15. Telles, S., Nagarathna, R. and Nagendra, H.R. (1998). Autonomic changes while mentally repeating two syllables – one meaningful and the other neutral. Indian Journal of Physiology and Pharmacology, 42(1): 57-63.

16. Telles, S., Nagarathna, R. and Nagendra, H.R. (1995). Autonomic changes during ‘OM’ meditation. Indian Journal of Physiology and Pharmacology, 39(4): 418-420.

17. Telles, S. and Desiraju, T. (1993). Autonomic changes in Brahmakumaris Raja yoga meditation. International Journal of Psychophysiology, 15(2): 147-152.

18. Telles, S. and Desiraju, T. (1992). Heart rate and respiratory changes accompanying yogic conditions of single thought and thoughtless states. Indian Journal of Physiology and Pharmacology, 36 (4): 293-294.

Yoga for girls in a remand home

19. Telles, S., Narendran, S., Raghuraj, P. Nagarathna, R. and Nagendra, H.R. (1997). Comparison of changes in autonomic and respiratory parameters of girls after yoga and games at a community home. Perceptual and Motor Skills, 84(1): 251-257.

Voluntary regulation of ‘involuntary’ functions

20. Raghavendra, B. R., Telles, S., Manjunath, N. K., Deepak, K. K., Naveen, K. V., and Subramanya, P. (2013). Voluntary heart rate reduction following yoga using different strategies. International Journal of Yoga, 6(1):26-30.

21. Telles, S., Joshi, M., Dash, M., Raghuraj, P., Naveen, K.V. and Nagendra, H.R. (2004). An evaluation of the ability to voluntarily reduce the heart rate after a month of yoga practice. Integrative Psychological & Behavioral Science, 39(2): 119-125.

22. Telles, S. and Vani, R. (2002). Reduction in voluntary pulse rate reduction achieved following yoga training. International Journal of Stress Management, 9(3): 236-239.

Yoga and stress management

23. Vempati, R. P. and Telles, S. (2000). Baseline occupational stress levels and physiological responses to a two day stress management program. Journal of Indian Psychology, 18 (1 & 2): 33-37.

Yoga for rehabilitation

24. Telles, S. and Srinivas, R.B. (1999). Autonomic and respiratory measures in children with impaired vision following yoga and physical activity programs. International Journal of Rehabilitation and Health, 4(2): 117-122.

General physiology

25. Naveen, K.V. and Telles, S. (1999). Sudomotor sympathetic hypofunction in Down’s syndrome. Indian Journal of Physiology and Pharmacology, 43(4): 463-466.